The UK's Only Dedicated Germ Cell Awareness Charity

Campaigns – Talking Bollocks

What is Talking Bollocks?

Talking Bollocks is The RCT’s testicular cancer awareness campaign!

rct talking bollocksWhy Talking Bollocks?
Well, we all do it, don’t we?! Whether it’s down the pub, sitting in the office or hanging out with your mates, everyone one of us is guilty of talking bollocks at some point!

It’s an age-old classic British saying, meaning that some-one is talking rubbish – we’ve flipped that on it’s head to try and get guys (and gals) to talk about their bollocks! However, you won’t find any rubbish here, just solid advice about the signs & symptoms of testicular cancer and how to check for them.

The aim of the campaign is to grab people’s attention, get them talking about testicular cancer, educate them on how to check for cancer and reduce the embarrassment factor that is all-too-often felt by guys when discussing their ‘private area’ AKA their bollocks!

If we can educate guys (and gals) to learn about the signs and symptoms & how to check, and reduce the ‘embarrassment factor’ surrounding talking about your bollocks (in a meaningful way – we all know guys talk about their bollocks waaaay too much!) then we can prompt guys to visit the GP’s and get themselves seen by a medical professional. Testicular cancer is over 96% curable if detected early, so Talking Bollocks really could save your life.

How do I Talk Bollocks?
First things first, you need to know the signs and symptoms of testicular cancer, as these are your warning signs that something might be wrong. If you experience anything listed below, we would urge you to visit your GP and explain what’s wrong.
Signs & Symptoms
• A lump in the testicle
• Swelling of the testicle
• Discomfort or pain in the testicle
• Heaviness of the scrotum
• Nipple or breast tenderness
Now that you know what to look out for, the only thing left to learn is how to check yourself so you can identify the signs and symptoms early and if needed, get yourself to the GP! We call checking your bollocks ‘performing a testicular self-exam’, just a fancy terminology for something that takes a couple of minutes a month and could save your life.

How to perform a testicular self-exam
Your guilt-free excuse to touch your balls at least once a month…

1. The best time to do a TSE is after a hot bath or shower (the skin is more relaxed, making it easier to examine your testicles). If possible stand in front of a mirror. Check for any swelling on the scrotal skin.

2. Examine one testicle at a time using both hands. Place the index and middle fingers under the testicle with the thumbs places on top. Firmly but gently roll the testicle between the thumbs and fingers to feel for any irregularities on the surface of the testicle.

3. Find the epididymis, a soft rope-like structure on the back of the testicle, which can be slightly tender to pressure. If you are familiar with this structure you won’t mistake it for a lump.

Please watch the video below to see our CEO Toby checking his balls (don’t worry, he’s using a plastic model pair!) and Talking Bollocks:

How to perform a testicular self-exam from #TheRCT

Now that you know the signs & symptoms of testicular cancer and how to perform a testicular self-exam once a month, the only thing left to do is start Talking Bollocks! Share this information with your friends via Social Media to help spread our message of awareness, talk openly and honestly about your bollocks to help break down the ‘embarrassment factor’ and give advice to others if they are concerned about their bollocks.

You can also download the latest Talking Bollocks awareness posters and help us raise awareness of testicular cancer (if needed, please make sure you ask permission to put them up first!)

If you’d like to know more about Testicular Cancer then please visit our page What is Germ Cell Cancer?

If you, or a loved one, has been affected by testicular cancer in any way then please feel free to contact us. Alternatively, please visit our resources page to view a list of trusted charities that are also happy to hear from you and may be able to help you in ways which we can’t (being a purely awareness-based charity). This may seem odd, but we’re all in this together, fighting the same fight and we just want to support people affected by this horrible disease.

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